WORKSHOPS/SEMINARS

Workshops and seminars are offered at additional fees on Monday through Friday, March 24 - 28, 2014. The sessions will be held at the College's Deerwood Center on Monday and Tuesday, except for the two-day leadership experience, which will be held at the Conference hotel. The Wednesday, Thursday and Friday (March 26, 27 and 28) workshops and seminars will be at the Conference hotel. Transportation to the Deerwood Center on Monday and Tuesday will be provided for Conference attendees staying at the Conference hotel. Lunch is provided for workshop and seminar participants who are registered for a full day (both morning and afternoon sessions) on Monday and/or Tuesday. Workshop and seminar fees are $75 for half-day sessions, $150 for full-day sessions, and $300 for persons registered for the 2-day leadership experience.

For the first time this year, persons in the local Jacksonville community who are interested in attending only the conference luncheons/keynote speakers and workshops/seminars will be able to do so at $75 for each luncheon or workshop (except the Leadership Experience 2 day workshop) without paying the full conference fee. Interested persons will need to register using the online registration form.

Seven workshops/seminars which are anticipated to be of special interest to conference attendees are identified as Featured Workshops/Seminar and are listed below, followed by a listing of all seminars and workshops.

 

Featured Workshops/Seminars

  1. Leadership Experience: Making the Move from Professor to Administrator—Is This for You? (two full days, March 24 and 25, Marriott Sawgrass Golf Resort and Spa)
The Jumping the Fence into Administrative Affairs Leadership Experience is designed for faculty considering administrative roles. The Leadership Experience will provide faculty the foundation for middle management administrative leadership growth and development. It is being delivered by the University of Florida's Institute of Higher Education. Through integrated exercises and examination of cases, participants will learn role-transitioning techniques from national experts and practitioners.

Session Leaders:
  • Leslie Krieger, Ph.D., SPHR, President/Consulting Psychologist, Assessment Technologies Group, Inc.
  • Dale Campbell, Ph.D., Director & Professor, Institute of Higher Education, University of Florida
  • Tina O'Daniels, Ed. D., Associate Director & Faculty, Institute of Higher Education, University of Florida
  • Carl Hite, Ph.D., President Emeritus, Cleveland State Community College, TN
  • Judy Bilsky, Ed. D., Vice President, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Kathryn Birmingham, Ph.D., Faculty, Institute of Higher Education, University of Florida and President, The Research Group
  1. The Changing Academy—Is It Really Changing? Should It? In What Ways? (Track 7, Thursday, March 27, 3pm-6pm, Marriott Sawgrass Golf Resort and Spa)
All around us, college and university administrators, state legislators and governors, and the federal government are suggesting that the traditional academy no longer works in the modern world. They are asking if the current curriculum and modes of operations are relevant or outdated. Does a humanities or history class help someone to get a job? Are lectures to small classes really the most effective learning practices? And yet this is not the first time in history that the academy's relevance has been challenged. This seminar will explore these issues and more as participants debate the future of the traditional academy in a modern world.

Session Leaders:
  • Stephen C. Ehrmann, Ph.D., Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning and Assoc. Professor, Ed. Tech. Leadership, Graduate School of Education and Human Development, George Washington University. Perhaps most well-known for his work with the Teaching, Learning and Technology Group (TLT), Steve Ehrmann has also served as a program officer with The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) as well as the Annenberg/CPB Projects at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
  • Alan Ruby, Senior Fellow, Higher Education Division, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Ruby has a 40-year career in government, business, philanthropy, and education ranging from classroom teacher to Australian deputy secretary of education to chair of the OECD education committee. He currently serves as a consultant to the World Bank, an adviser to the Nazarbayev Intellectual Schools and the Nazarbayev University in Kazakhstan, and as a senior fellow for Internationalization at NAFSA.
  • J. Noah Brown, M. P. P., President and CEO, Association of Community College Trustees (ACCT). Mr. Brown provides national leadership on behalf of more than 6,000 elected and appointed officials governing 1,200 community colleges throughout the United States, and his experience spans more than 30 years in the nation's capital He recently served as a member of the 21st-Century Commission on the Future of Community Colleges.
  • Chris Birch, Professor and Director of Enterprise and Innovation, University of Greenwich Business School, London. Mr. Birch served at executive level in two large UK universities with strategic responsibility for research, enterprise and knowledge transfer. He is an experienced classroom practitioner and was an Internet pedagogic pioneer. His phrase "powered by technology, driven by learning” has been widely used. He is committed to the principle of creating innovative mutually value-adding delivery partnerships.
  • Wyne Karnath, M.A., Adjunct Instructor of English, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Moderator: Cynthia Bioteau, Ph.D., President, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  1. MOOCs: Education's Holy Grail or the Great Illusion?—A Seminar(Track 7, Wednesday, March 26, 3pm-6pm, Marriott Sawgrass Golf Resort and Spa)
MOOCS (Massive Open Online Courses) are described by some as the future of higher education learning because they provide higher education for large numbers of people at very low cost. Others see them as institutional marketing schemes with little foundation in reality. Join your colleagues in an interactive discussion of major ongoing MOOC experiments and the research results to date. Help decide: Where do we go from here?

Session Leaders:
  • Laura W. Perna, Ph.D., Director of the Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy (AHEAD), Professor, Graduate School of Education, Faculty Fellow in the Institute for Urban Research, and Penn Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. She has served as the Vice President of the Postsecondary Education Division (Division J) of the American Education Research Association (AERA) and is currently the President-elect of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE).
  • Linda Harasim, Ph.D., Professor at Simon Fraser University's School of Communication, is a pioneer and one of the inventors of online education. She invented the pedagogy of online collaborative learning at the University of Toronto and taught the first online university course in the world there in 1985. She later moved to Simon Fraser University, Vancouver Canada, where she teaches in the areas of "Social Media and the Knowledge Society.” In 1995 she founded and served as CEO of the TeleLearning Network of Centre of Excellence (TL*NCE) in Canada, receiving $25 million from the Canadian government and another $25 million from the public and private sector for an eight-year project to study and design new online collaborative knowledge-building tools, environments and pedagogies for education and training worldwide. Dr. Harasim has written 5 books on the field and is currently at work on a new book.
  • Linda D. Collins, Ed. D., Lead E-Learning Mentor, Northcentral University, and Residential Faculty and Coordinator Open Entry Programs, Mesa Community College.
Moderator: Jana Kooi, President, Open Campus, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  1. Research & Best Practices in Developmental Education—A National Perspective Seminar (Track 7, Friday, March 28, 12:30pm-3:30pm, Marriott Sawgrass Golf Resort and Spa)
What experiments in developmental education are being conducted in higher education, and what are the research results? Are best practices emerging that have a solid research basis in any of the three areas of reading, composition, and math? Join your colleagues in a roundtable interactive discussion of the major experimental programs now ongoing throughout the US.

Session Leaders:
  • Julie Alexander, Ed.D., Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs, Division of Florida Colleges
  • Patricia Levine-Brown, M.P.A., President, National Association for Developmental Education and Professor of Communications, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Marilyn Metzcher-Smith, M.A., Director, Southeastern Center for Cooperative Learning and Professor of Developmental English/Writing, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Jane Serbousek, Consultant, Higher Education Research at Community College Research Center, North Carolina. Formerly Asst. professor of Mathematics and Faculty Lead for the Virginia Community College Developmental Math Redesign Team.
Moderator: Kathleen Ciez-Volz, Ph.D., Executive Dean, Academic Foundations, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  1. Placing a Substantive Conception of Critical Thinking at the Heart of Teaching and Learning (Track 1, Thursday, March 27, 3pm-6pm, Marriott Sawgrass Golf Resort and Spa)
Bringing critical thinking into instruction entails understanding the concepts and principles within critical thinking and then applying those concepts throughout the curriculum. It means developing powerful strategies that emerge when we begin to understand critical thinking. In this session the focus is on strategies for engaging the intellect at potentially all levels of instruction. These strategies are powerful and useful, because each is a way to get students actively engaged in thinking about what they are trying to learn. Each represents a shift of responsibility for learning from the teacher to the student. These strategies suggest ways to get your students to do the hard work of learning.

Session Leaders:
  • Gerald Nosich, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy, SUNY at Buffalo
  1. Recruitment and Retention of Women and Minorities to STEM Programs (Track 7, full day, March 25, FSCJ Deerwood Campus)
Learn best practices in recruiting and retaining women and minority students to STEM programs through activities, examples, and case studies. National Science Foundation supported techniques and research-based methods will be covered. Online and hard copy training materials support the workshop activities.

Session Leaders:
  • Ede Slovin, Trainer, National Institute for Women in Trades, Technology and Science (IWITTS).
  • Angel Rodriguez, Ph.D., R. Irene Craney Fischley Endowed Teaching Chair Professor of Biology, Upward Bound STEM and Service Learning programs, Broward College and National Hispanic Community College Council Fellow.
  1. Brain Research and Holistic Instruction: How to engage students emotionally and cognitively toward deeper learning (Track 1, full day, March 25, FSCJ Deerwood Campus)
Learn how brain research, relevancy, and critical thinking work together to engage students cognitively and emotionally in this interactive workshop. Participants will apply new knowledge with the afternoon practice activity. Author and celebrated neuropsychologist Sam Goldstein will review his research on fostering risk and resilience, overcoming underachieving, strategies for engaging depressed/angry/defiant students, cognitive functioning and creative supportive professional connections with students

Session Leaders:
  • Sam Goldstein, Ph.D., Clinical Director of the Neurology, Learning and Behavior Center, Salt Lake City, Utah. A neuropsychologist, researcher and published author, Dr. Goldstein is licensed as a psychologist and certified as a developmental disabilities evaluator.
  • Susan Haunty, M.Ed., has 30 years' experience leading urban adult education programs, and has published works on teaching at-risk students, developmental education and struggling college credit students. Haunty is a trainer in holistic instruction and academic case management.

All seminars and workshops are listed below within each track by date and time, except for the following special Leadership Experience.

 

Special 2 Day Leadership Experience

LEADERSHIP EXPERIENCE: Making the Move from Professor to Administrator—Is It for You?

Note: This two-day Leadership Experience comprises 4 half-day cohort sessions on Monday, March 24, and Tuesday, March 25, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. each day. All sessions will be held at the conference hotel.

The Jumping the Fence into Administrative Affairs Leadership Experience is designed for faculty considering administrative roles. The Leadership Experience will provide faculty the foundation for middle management administrative leadership growth and development. The Leadership Experience is being delivered by the University of Florida's Institute of Higher Education. Through integrated exercises and examination of cases participants will learn role-transitioning techniques from national experts and practitioners. Cohort Experience This is a cohort registered Leadership Experience with the pre-conference requirement of each attendee completing the WAVE© Personality Assessment. Participants will be charged a fee of $300, which includes pre- and post-WAVE© Assessments, interactive 2-day Leadership Experience conducted by national experts, and six months of executive coaching to produce a Professional Development Personalized Learning Plan. Pre-Conference Assessment All Leadership Experience participants are to have completed the WAVE© Assessment by March 1, 2014. Upon registration of the Leadership Experience, attendees will receive a web link and instructions to complete the assessment. WAVE Assessment The WAVE© personality assessment was developed by Peter Saville of Saville Consulting, Ltd. utilizing more than 30 years of research and development in industrial-organizational psychology assessments. The WAVE© is an integrated suite of assessment tools which identifies leadership development characteristics and competencies. A. Session 1, Monday, March 24, 9 a.m. - noon WAVE© Feedback and Development Personalized Learning Plan. This session will be held at the conference hotel. The Leadership Experience cohort will have a feedback session regarding the results of their personal WAVE© Assessments. The 21st Century Leadership profile will be reviewed regarding the leadership characteristics, competencies and attributes identified to effectively serve institutions of higher education. Attendees will then be introduced to the individualized creation of their own Professional Development Personalized Learning Plan.

Session Leaders:
  • Leslie Krieger, Ph.D., SPHR, President/Consulting Psychologist, Assessment Technologies Group, Inc.
  • Dale Campbell, Ph.D.,Director and Professor, Institute of Higher Education, University of Florida
  • Tina O'Daniels, Ed.D.,Associate Director and Faculty, Institute of Higher Education, University of Florida
B. & C. Sessions 2 and 3, Monday, March 24, 1 p.m.- 4 p.m. and Tuesday, March 25, 9 a.m. - noon. Leadership Experience modules will be sequenced by topic and presenters for learning key leadership theories and practical models that will support Leading Your Institution into the Future. These sessions will be held at the conference hotel. Topics presented by national experts will include:

  • Identifying and Developing Your Leadership Style
  • Ethical Leadership
  • Role and Responsibilities of Middle Managers
  • Managing Peers and Assessing Teaching Effectiveness
  • Systems Thinking and Supporting Strategic Direction
  • Change Management
  • Leaders with Financial Responsibility—Finance for Institutional Decisions
  • Resource Development
  • Handling Differences and Conflict when Managing Peers and Supporting Student Success
  • Institutional Effectiveness and Data Driven Decision Making
Participants will also continue to work on their individualized creation of a Professional Development Personalized Learning Plan. With personalized guidance, attendees will solidify the attributes on which to focus over the next 6+ months.
  • Cynthia Bioteau, Ph.D. President, Florida State College at Jacksonville, FL
  • Carl Hite, Ph.D., President Emeritus, Cleveland State Community College, TN
  • Judy Bilsky , Ed.D., Vice President and Provost, Florida State College at Jacksonville, FL
  • Kathryn Birmingham , Ph.D., Faculty, Institute of Higher Education, University of Florida and President, The Research Group.
  • Dale Campbell , Ph.D., Director and Professor, Institute of Higher Education, University of Florida
  • Katherine Johnson , Ed.D., Pasco-Hernando State College, FL
  • Leslie Krieger , Ph.D., SPHR, President/Consulting Psychologist, Assessment Technologies Group, Inc.
  • Tina O’Daniels , Ed.D., Associate Director and Faculty, Institute of Higher Education, University of Florida
  • Angel Rodriguez , Ed. D., Professor, Stephen C. Barker Endowed Teaching Chair, 2013 ; Motorola Corporation Endowed Teaching Chair, 2005; In Scientia Veritas, In Arte Honestas; Broward College, FL
  • Virginia Stewart Huntley , MBA, Director of Alamo Colleges Online The Alamo Colleges, San Antonio, TX
D. Session 4. Tuesday, March 25, 1-4 pm. This session will be held at the conference hotel. Participants will continue to work on their individualized creation of a Development Personalized Learning Plan. With personalized guidance, attendees will solidify the attributes on which to focus over the next 6+ months. Executive coaching by Dr. O'Daniels will be scheduled with each participant. Cohort Follow-up Session (electronic if needed) of all participants will be scheduled for Fall, 2014.

All Other Workshop descriptions.

Monday, March 24, 2014
Morning Sessions
9 a.m. - 12 noon Developing Engaging Discussion Questions for Social Sciences and Humanities Classes The content of social science and humanities classes is ideal for discussion questions, and most faculty are well aware that really good discussion questions improve critical and creative thinking. But how do you develop really relevant, engaging questions? And how effective for improving critical thinking are methods such as role-playing and obligating students to take both sides in a discussion? This interactive workshop will address those kinds of concerns-and also provide practice and good feedback for developing questions that engage the full range of your students' learning styles.

Session Leaders:
  • Faye Wisner, M. A., Professor of Psychology and Education (retired) Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Jerry W. Wisner, M. A., Professor of Psychology (retired) Florida State College at Jacksonville
Problem-Based Learning Students often wonder how a particular class will help them succeed in the real world. This workshop will emphasize problem solving as a basis for teaching and learning. Participants will learn how to use scenarios and case studies that require students to apply knowledge to life situations. This workshop will also address the incorporation of cooperative learning and team building strategies into the problem-based learning process.

Session Leader:
  • Miriam Folk, M.Ed., Professor of Reading, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Erica Mack, Counselor Coordinator, FLorida State College at Jacksonville
  • Mel Norwood, Ph.D., Campus Achievement Leader Florida State College at Jacksonville
Monday, March 24, 2014
Afternoon Sessions
1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Capturing Students' Attention: Icebreakers, Energizers, and Closers Capturing and holding the attention of your students can sometimes be a challenge, but not if you use some of these creative and engaging strategies. Join us for an exciting and interactive session as we demonstrate a variety of icebreakers, closers, and energizers that will help grab your students' attention and keep them motivated and focused throughout your class. Our panel of student success experts will share some of their best ideas and want to hear yours, too. This session promises to be both fun and informative.

Session Leaders:
  • Raye Angela Greene, Adjunct Professor of English, Florida State College of Jacksonville
  • Lindsay Ott, B.A.S., Administrative Specialist-Scholarships, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Technology Strategies That Enhance Learning in the Social Sciences Many professors trained in the use of technology in the classroom wonder, "Exactly how do these methods work in my classroom and in my specific discipline?" This workshop will provide social science instructors with specific strategies for incorporating technology into their courses. Participants will leave with ideas for improving learning outcomes through increased use of online resources and interactive methodologies.

Session Leader:
  • Ann Madden, M.Ed., Professor of Psychology, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Morning Sessions
9 a.m. - 12 noon Brain Research and Holistic Instruction: How to Engage Students Emotionally and Cognitively Toward Deeper Learning (2 half-day sessions in one day.) Learn how brain research, relevancy and critical thinking work together to engage students cognitively and emotionally in this interactive workshop. Participants will apply new knowledge with the afternoon practice activity. Author and celebrated neuropsychologist Sam Goldstein will review his research on fostering risk and resilience, overcoming underachieving, strategies for engaging depressed/angry/defiant students, cognitive functioning and creative supportive professional connections with students. Susan Haunty will cover right brain-left brain strategies with techniques to move students from concrete to abstract thinking. Afternoon group exercises will model how to gain buy-in for independent learning from high-risk students. This workshop is designed for Adult Education, TESOL, EAP, Developmental Education, and college credit instructors.

Session Leaders:
  • Sam Goldstein, Ph.D., Clinical Director of the Neurology, Learning and Behavior Center, Salt Lake City, Utah. A neuropsychologist, researcher and published author, Dr. Goldstein is licensed as a psychologist and certified as a developmental disabilities evaluator.
  • Susan Haunty, M.Ed., has 30 years of experience leading urban adult education programs, and has published works on teaching at-risk students, developmental education and struggling college credit students. Haunty is a trainer in holistic instruction and academic case management.
Dual Enrollment: Effective Student Advising and Communication This workshop on dual enrollment-high school students taking college classes-will explore student advising and communication from a variety of perspectives. A recent graduate of a dual enrollment program will share reflections, and a dual enrollment coordinator will suggest effective communication strategies. The workshop will discuss the importance of academic planning and appreciative advising as well as the recruitment of dual enrollment students transitioning into full-fledged collegiate life. Please join us for what promises to be an exciting time of interactive dialogue and information sharing.

Session Leaders:
  • Nancy Yurko, Ph.D., Executive Dean of Arts and Sciences, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Alison Brazzeal, M.Ed., Director of Program Development, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Jametoria Burton, M.L.I.S., Associate Director, Program Development,. Florida State College at Jacksonville
Writing Effective Short Stories Fiction writing can be a full-time job, a pleasant escape from a boring job, or simply an interesting way to spend free time. But in most cases, writing is either essential to a person's way of life or totally alien. This workshop is for everyone who craves to write something REALLY good-especially short stories with great depth. How to achieve this standard? Come and interact with others who feel the same way about writing that you do, and work with an expert on your next truly great short story.

Session Leader:
  • April Eberhardt, Literary Change Agent, Sonoma, California
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Afternoon Sessions
1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Brain Research and Holistic Instruction, Session 2 (To enroll for Session 2, you must have enrolled for Session 1.) Continuation of the morning session with practice in applying what has been learned.

Session Leaders:
  • Sam Goldstein, Ph.D., Clinical Director of the Neurology, Learning and Behavior Center, Salt Lake City, Utah. A neuropsychologist, researcher and published author, Dr. Goldstein is licensed as a psychologist and certified as a developmental disabilities evaluator.
  • Susan Haunty, M.Ed., has 30 years of experience leading urban adult education programs, and has published works on teaching at-risk students, developmental education and struggling college credit students. Haunty is a trainer in holistic instruction and academic case management.
STEM Museum and College Partnerships STEM and STEAM museum education staff and college professors as a team provide the synergy to make science come alive for students. Learn about models in Aviation, History, Astronomy, Biology, etc. for innovative curriculum and resources. Mathematics and Science faculty as well as STEM museum education staff will take away practical tips.

Session Leader:
  • Thomas Webber, Director, MOSH (Museum of Science and History), Jacksonville, FL
  • Mike Reynolds, Ph.D., Dean of Arts and Science, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Poems: What Do They Really Mean? In this interactive poetry session, you will have the unique opportunity to provide your insights to see how they track with the poet's intentions.

Session Leader:
  • Charles Feldstein, Ph.D., Professor of English, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Wednesday, March 26, 2014
3 p.m. - 6 p.m. Adding to your Teaching Repertoire: Integrating Action Research into the Lesson Plans Accrediting bodies are increasingly calling on full-time faculty and adjunct instructors to expand their teaching repertoire to include multiple teaching styles. This interactive session will not only be an "action research" demonstration, but will be a research session, calling on YOUR best practices in identifying "effective teaching." This is NOT a lecture, nor a presentation. During this time you will be fully engaged in group activities actively participating with research-based practices, and leaving with extremely relevant practice and skill sets to add to your teaching repertoire.

Session Leader:
  • Matthew Basham, Ph.D., Director, Sumter County Partnership for Workforce and Innovation, Lake Sumter State College, FL
The Best Kept Secret in Screenwriting--IT'S NOT ABOUT THE STORY This interactive workshop/seminar will discuss three fundamental concepts of screenwriting‐Unifying Theme, It's All About You, and the Format and Job of Screenwriting. Sounds simple? Well...
Consider Unifying Theme—movies have a bone structure that bonds a film together; --this is the Unifying Theme‐the plot. However, the characters must make it come alive. The success or failure of a movie depends on whether the audience cares about the characters. The story or unifying theme is not as dramatically important as the characters that propel it.
Now consider It's All About You —Can you delve deeply into yourself? A good writer must explore her/his own failures, fears, doubts, pain, desires, and needs to develop living breathing characters.
And finally, there's Format and the Job of Screenwriting . Movies have specific structure and format which must be learned and followed. The simple mistake of incorrectly formatting a screenplay will label a writer an amateur and their work of genius will not be read. And, the screenplay is not a novel--no back-story, no internal thoughts, and no description that cannot be visually seen. And then there is rewriting... Want to try your hand?

Session Leader:
  • Andy Ruben, Screenwriter, California and Florida. Ruben, a motion picture and TV Screenwriting instructor, has taught and served as Filmmaker in Residence for eight years in the Motion Picture School at Florida State University, and for eight years at the Academy of Art University in Motion Pictures and Television in San Francisco.
Thursday, March 27, 2014
3 p.m. - 6 p.m. Increasing Students' Critical Thinking Abilities Placing a Substantive Conception of Critical Thinking at the Heart of Teaching and Learning Bringing critical thinking into instruction entails understanding the concepts and principles within critical thinking and then applying those concepts throughout the curriculum. It means developing powerful strategies that emerge when we begin to understand critical thinking. In this session we will focus on strategies for engaging the intellect at potentially all levels of instruction. These strategies are powerful and useful, because each is a way to get students actively engaged in thinking about what they are trying to learn. Each represents a shift of responsibility for learning from the teacher to the student. These strategies suggest ways to get your students to do the hard work of learning.

Session Leader:
  • Gerald Nosich, Professor of Philosophy, SUNY at Buffalo
Friday, March 28, 2014
12:30 p.m.- 3:30 p.m. Uncomfortable Teaching: Fording the Difficult Dialogues Gain techniques in handling academic subjects that may generate distress or make discussion difficult. Teaching a wide range of issues from religion, classical humanities, history, political science, social to behavioral sciences may be potentially uncomfortable for students and the instructor. Issues such as violence, rape, genocide, slavery, sexism, racism, LBTGQ in history and current events are used as examples to help students work through dialogue about trauma and analyze deeply without overstepping our bounds.

The techniques learned in this workshop can be used in all college disciplines.

Session Leader:
  • Stacie Brensilver Berman, Ph.D., Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, NYU. Stacie is researching LBTGQ topics in history curricula and teaches social studies at Edward R. Murrow High School in Brooklyn.
Monday, March 24, 2014
Morning Sessions
9 a.m. - 12 noon Basic Instructional Design for Blended/Hybrid Courses The student learning experience should begin with a well-designed course; however, the teaching strategies used to teach face-to-face courses may not work as well in a blended/hybrid environment. In this workshop, participants will learn how to design an effective blended/hybrid course focusing on content delivery, communication, and assessment of student learning. This workshop will include an introduction to the concept of "universal design" to assist faculty who teach ADA compatible hybrid/blended courses.

Session Leaders:
  • Jill Hagenberger, Ph.D., E-Learning Instructional Designer, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Nicola Wayer, M.Ed., E-Learning Instructional Designer, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Kritauoth Inpornvijit, Ph.D., E-Learning Instructional Designer, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Cooperative Learning Have you wondered why some groups work together effectively and achieve their learning goals while others do not? This workshop will provide insights about creating, managing, and assessing diverse learning groups in your college classroom, as well as introduce the theoretical principles of cooperative learning. Join us in exploring how students reach optimum achievement through their work in cooperative learning groups.

Session Leaders:
  • Marilyn Metzcher-Smith, M.A., Director, Southeastern Center for Cooperative Learning and Professor of Developmental English/Writing, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Inez Whipple, M.A., E-Learning Instructional Designer, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Engaging Students Through Classroom Interaction Today's students are accustomed to a fast-paced world of constant stimulation. They are wired differently than previous generations of learners. This workshop will address the challenge of engaging our current students in the learning process through interaction with the content material as well as with each other. Learn strategies that connect your students to their learning by making classroom material relevant to their world and their experiences.

Session Leaders:
  • Dana Kuehn, M.S., Professor of Psychology, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Lindsay Webster, M.Ed., M.S.W., Professor of Sociology, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Monday, March 24, 2014
Afternoon Sessions
1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Developing Students' Online Learning Skills Online learning requires new approaches to teaching and learning. If you teach an online course, you need to assess your students' readiness to be online learners and then develop their skills so they can be successful. Are your students prepared? This workshop is designed to introduce you to interactive and effective ways to prepare your students to take online courses.

Session Leaders:
  • Sheri Litt, Ph. D., Dean of Arts and Sciences, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Patti McConnell, Student Success Coordinator, , Florida State College at Jacksonville
Motivating the Online Student Online learning has significantly changed the delivery of knowledge. It has clearly helped higher education to "spread the word". Yet, at the same time, it presents a new paradigm for student learning, resulting in a type of culture shock. Distance learning courses are different from traditional classroom courses, the so-called "chalk and talk" courses, and there are strategies students need to know to be successful in online classes. This workshop will help faculty rethink the ways in which they conduct online learning and will provide specific strategies which faculty can employ to help students achieve success in their online classes.

Session Leader:
  • Alex J. Kajstura, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Chemistry, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Using Smart Tools to Increase Student Success Today's college students are accustomed to using online media for personal communication in almost every facet of their lives. These same electronic resources have the potential to positively impact the classroom learning experience. This session will introduce the plethora of online tools that can excite and engage students and simultaneously increase success and completion. New applications for tablets, smartphones, and other practical tools will be utilized for this interactive session.

Session Leaders:
  • Trever Brolliar, B. F. A., Director, Information Systems, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Amanda Mojica, Engineer I, Multimedia, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Brandi Bleak, B. S., Engineer IV, Software, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Monday, March 24, 2014
Morning Sessions
9 a.m. - 12 noon Accelerated Developmental Education Courses-An Interactive Seminar For many, many years, colleges and universities have struggled with the issue of students entering with inadequate skills in reading, writing, and/or math. The general answer has been to segregate these students into semester-long content courses even though some students could master the required skills in a matter of weeks. These students have not been permitted to enter college credit courses until they have exhibited skills mastery even though some students are capable of doing some college credit work while they develop their writing or math skills. How can this situation be improved? In this interactive seminar, join colleagues to discuss the latest research findings and best practices and to determine a more effective path for the future.

Session Leaders:
  • Patricia Levine-Brown, Ed.S., President, National Association for Developmental Education, and Professor of Communications, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Elaina Given, Ph.D., Professor of Developmental English, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Monday, March 24, 2014
Afternoon Sessions
1 p.m.- 4 p.m. Redesigning Developmental Math with Modular Courses Colleges are offering redesigned developmental math courses that allow students to complete sequential math courses in a single term. Collaborative learning, peer learning, and technology are often essential components of the redesigned math courses. The higher level of engagement allows instructors to quickly identify individual student needs and intervene with appropriate strategies. In this interactive presentation, participants will experience a redesigned math class. The facilitator will share the accelerated model used to engage participants by sharing classroom engagement and customized remediation techniques.

Session Leaders:
  • Jerry E. Shawver, M. A., Professor of Mathematics, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Sarae Mathews, Ed.D., Professor of Mathematics, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Morning Sessions
9 a.m.- 12 noon Math Jam: Setting First-Year Students on the Right Path Math Jam is a nationally recognized intervention and 2012 Community College Futures Assembly Bellwether Award Winner. Pasadena City College created the highly effective one-week summer program as the important entry point to its First Year Experience program. Math Jam integrates innovative math instruction and structured supplemental support with engaging college orientation activities in a stress-free environment. First-time students learn about college life, create valuable relationships with faculty and staff, and have opportunities to experience success in math before they begin their fall math course. Math Jam is scalable and sustainable. Institutions throughout the country have replicated it. Advanced technical education, developmental education, and college credit mathematics faculty, counselors, and administrators are encouraged to attend this powerful, interactive workshop.

Session Leaders:
  • Brock Klein, Associate Dean, Teaching and Learning Center, Pasadena City College, CA
  • Jay Cho, Associate Professor of Math, Pasadena City, CA
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Afternoon Sessions
1 p.m.- 4 p.m. Do the Math: The Impact of Course Redesign on Learning and Scheduling Cleveland State Community College and Chattanooga State Community College will share their national award-winning mathematics course redesign model involving developmental and college-level math courses. In 2008, the Cleveland State Math Department undertook a course redesign project with very positive effects on student learning, engagement, instruction, enrollment and scheduling. These institutions will share their data and strategies for success. Math faculty and administrators will benefit from this workshop.

Session Leaders:
  • Karen Wyrick, Mathematics Department Chair, Cleveland State Community College, TN
  • John Squires, Department Head and Director of Do the Math, Chattanooga State Community College, Chattanooga, TN
Integrating Basic Skills Content into College Credit Courses-A Seminar Can students who enter college deficient in one or more basic skills be successful in credit courses without prior remediation of their deficiencies? In what ways can we address this problem of inadequate skills among entering students? What are the ramifications of each approach? Join your faculty colleagues in this interactive discussion about research and best practices in this area of integrating basic skills into college credit courses.

Session Leaders:
  • Marilyn Metzcher-Smith, M.A., Director, Southeastern Center for Cooperative Learning, and Professor of Developmental English/Writing, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Marcelle Bessman, Adjunct Instructor, Mathematics, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Friday, March 28, 2014
12:30 p.m.- 3:30 p.m. One Faculty Voice Can Do So Little; Together We Learn So Much (Authentic College Readiness Alliance Model) Values
  • Collaboration
  • Life-long learning
  • Teaching excellence and teacher satisfaction
Growing from the individual challenges of isolated educators to a model of collaboration, Elgin Community College's Alliance for College Readiness demonstrates the power of community. One School Can Do So Little; Together We Can Do So Much Elgin Community College forged a strategic alliance with outstanding outcomes. Since 2006, the percent of direct-from-high school graduates at Elgin Community College needing remediation has decreased 13% overall, and 13% in mathematics because of faculty-centered school district partnerships. Participants will not only learn how ECC fostered and continues to develop collaboration but will also explore their strengths as collaborators and begin development of their own plans for collaboration and community in their own districts. Educators will explore how to rekindle the fire for their own passionate teaching and how this manifests itself in student intrinsic motivation. As a 2013 Community College Futures Assembly Bellwether Award Winner for Instructional Programs and Services, the Elgin team will demonstrate how to replicate such an alliance. College faculty, administrators, high school teachers, and community alliance partners will benefit from this session.

Session Leaders:
  • Libby Roeger, Ed.D.Dean, College Transitions and Developmental Education, Elgin Community College, IL
  • Alison Douglas, Assistant Professor, English and Director, Alliance for College Readiness, Elgin Community College, IL
Research and Best Practices in Developmental Education-A National Perspective Seminar What experiments in developmental education are being conducted in higher education, and what are the research results? Are best practices emerging that have a solid research basis in any of the three areas of reading, composition, and math? Join your colleagues in a roundtable interactive discussion of the major experimental programs now ongoing throughout the US.

Session Leaders:
  • Julie Alexander, Ed.D., Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs, Division of Florida Colleges
  • Marilyn Metzcher-Smith, M.A., Director, Southeastern Center for Cooperative Learning and Professor of Developmental English/Writing, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Patricia Levine-Brown, Ed.S., President, National Association for Developmental Education and Professor of Communications, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Jane Serbousek, Consultant, Higher Education Research at Community College Research Center, North Carolina. Formerly Asst. professor of Mathematics and Faculty Lead for the Virginia Community College Developmental Math Redesign Team.
Moderator: Kathleen Ciez-Volz, Ph.D., Executive Dean, Academic Foundations, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Morning Sessions
9 a.m.- 12 noon Social Learning: Blogger, Twitter, and Pinterest in the Classroom Join us for an engaging open forum on new social learning technologies that can be used to enhance student learning such as Google Documents, Blogger, YouTube, Prezi, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Elluminate, Survey Monkey. Participants are invited to share their own favorite sites and tools as well.

Session Leader:
  • Jose Lepervanche, Ph.D., Professor of Supervision and Management, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Afternoon Sessions
1 p.m.- 4 p.m. Gamification and Brain-Based Learning Brain-based teaching affects students' brains in a way that is logical, effective, and efficient. Where neuroscience, psychology, and pedagogy intersect, a brain-centered classroom can be created. Learn to introduce content in a way that activates the neurons, grows dendrites, fires up the synapses, and lights up the frontal lobe. Then power it up even further by adding games that motivate students to advance in your courses. This workshop will demonstrate strategies that challenge the intellect and enhance student engagement.

Session Leader:
  • Amy Baskin, M.F.A., Professor of English, Florida State College at Jacksonville
"I Googled My Professor": Using Social Media to Enhance Learning Beyond the Classroom During this hands-on-keyboard workshop, participants will look at how their work as a professor is communicated via the Internet. We will discuss the benefits and pitfalls of using various social media like Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Twitter, and YouTube; learn how students use Florida State College at Jacksonville's "comparison" tool for choosing their classes; and get practical experience with writing and updating a dynamic faculty profile and biography.

Session Leader:
  • Wayne Francis, M.A., Adjunct Professor of English, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Monday, March 24, 2014
Morning Sessions
9 a.m. - 12 noon Designing Your Personal/Professional Website A professional looking website is a necessity for faculty to communicate effectively with students and colleagues. Faculty can use the website to display a CV, post research interests, and publish course syllabi for students to preview courses. In this workshop, faculty will learn how to design, publish, and modify engaging webpages.

Session Leader:
  • James Rhodes, Ph.D., Professor of Computer and Information systems, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Enhancing Student Services by Applying a Customer-Service Orientation Amid tightening budgets and growing competition, it is imperative that college and university student support services adopt a customer-service orientation to ensure that students experience excellent support. In the competitive arena of recruiting and retaining students, staff members are the crucial element. Built on lessons from organizations known for high quality customer service, this workshop will explain how many effective practices can be applied to the world of higher education student support services. Come away with tools you can use every day!

Session Leaders:
  • Martina Perry, M.S., Student Services Training Coordinator, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Jennifer Ihrig, Clerical Specialist, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Pamela Williams, M.A., Campus Enrollment Leader, Florida State College at Jacksonville
iTeaching: Incorporating the iPad into Classroom Instruction In this workshop, participants will look at several apps-most of which are free-to use for classroom management and grading, as well as instructional apps useful for creating presentations or tutorials for students. The workshop will include a demonstration of each app and a discussion of its benefits and potential drawbacks. Among the apps covered will be Teacher Kit, iAnnotate, Dropbox, Educreations, Explain Everything, Onlive Desktop, and others. PLEASE BRING YOUR IPAD TO THIS WORKSHOP.

Session Leaders:
  • Trever Brolliar, B.F.A., Director, Information Systems, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Amanda Mojica, Engineer I, Multimedia, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Brandi Bleak, B.S., Engineer IV, Software, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Betina Malhotra, Ph.D., Professor of Education, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Monday, March 24, 2014
Afternoon Sessions
1 p.m.- 4 p.m. Blackboard: A Guided Tour for Faculty Explore the newest features in Blackboard Learn 9.1 Service Pack 13. In this hands-on workshop, participants will explore the new interface features such as ADA test options, Crocdoc document display, new testing options, student learning tools, and more. Participants will be able to see both instructor and student views of these new features.

Session Leader:
  • Bill Ganza, Ed.D., Director of Faculty Development, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Morning Sessions
9 a.m. - 12 noon Developing Winning Grant Applications Is there any academic department that has all its needs met? So how can you help meet these needs? Grants may be the answer. Two questions must follow: What topics are "hot" with the granting agencies? How does one develop a proposal? Whoa! We almost slid over the most important element-your ideas. No matter what you feel your department needs, and no matter what is hot with the granting agencies, you have to have a good idea-that's first and foremost. In this interactive workshop, you'll find out what many of the granting agencies want, and you will work with teams of colleagues to brainstorm ideas that will benefit you, your department, and your institution.

Session Leaders:
  • Phyllis Renninger, Ph.D., GPC, Director of Resource Development, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Jennifer Peterson, GPC, Resource Development Officer, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Sarah Reardon, Resource Development Officer, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Tyler Winkler, GPC, Resource Development Officer, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Student Analytics: Data-Based Decision Making to Increase Student Success Analytics is the use of data, statistical analysis, and explanatory and predictive models to gain insights and act on complex issues. In practice, analytics integrates large data sets, statistical techniques, data mining, and predictive modeling to produce actionable intelligence to support decision making and improve results. Current application areas in higher education are varied and diverse, including enrollment management, student success, student retention, degree progress/completion/cost, finance/budgeting, and instructional management. This workshop will provide an overview of concepts, terminology, and applications of predictive analytics in higher education as well as selected examples of projects at Florida State College at Jacksonville. As a participant you will gain a better understanding of how the college is developing its capacity and use of predictive analytics as well as current practices and applications in the field of institutional research.

Session Leader:
  • Greg Michalski, Ph.D., Director of Student Analytics and Research, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Supporting Students With Diverse Needs: A Multi-Tiered Approach Today's learners have extremely diverse backgrounds and expectations. While there are many traditional-aged tech-savvy students, there also are many returning adults who have full-time jobs and families and are trying to juggle school among their numerous commitments. All students, however, have high expectations for their learning environment. Educational institutions need to become innovative in their course delivery and student services as well as be flexible enough to meet the diverse demands of these students, particularly to remain competitive within this environment. This workshop will explain a multi-tiered approach to addressing student needs in an evolving educational landscape.

Session Leaders:
  • Kimberly Hardy, Ph.D., Executive Director, Student Success and Learning Engagements, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Karinda Barrett, Ph.D., Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Tallahassee Community College
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Afternoon Sessions
1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Blackboard: A Guided Tour for Faculty (Repeat) Explore the newest features in Blackboard Learn 9.1 / Service Pack 13. In this hands-on workshop, participants will explore the new interface features such as ADA test options, Crocdoc document display, new testing options, student learning tools, and more. Participants will be able to see both instructor and student views of these new features.

Session Leader:
  • Bill Ganza, Ed.D., Director of Faculty Development, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Morning Sessions
9 a.m. - 12 noon Characteristics of a Successful Leader: Is This You? What does good leadership look like? Thousands of articles and books have been published describing the characteristics of a superior academic organizational leader. Some researchers and authors claim a superior leader possesses certain traits or abilities; others say leadership is all personality. Still others maintain good leadership is a function of behaviors-not necessarily intentions or thoughts-that are crucial. In this interactive workshop, participants will explore and identify traits associated with a leader as well examine the development of a leader.

Session Leaders:
  • Richard Greene, Ed. D., Associate Dean of Liberal Arts, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Terry Sawma, Ed. D., Dean of Career Education, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Christie Griffin, M.Ed., Student Success Advisor, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • James Campbell, Interim Manager, Academic Success Center, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Kathleen Ciez-Volz, Ed.D., Executive Dean of Academic Foundations, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Afternoon Sessions
1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Exploring Academic Leadership: What's It's Like to Be a Dean? Explore the world of college leadership in this workshop designed to help you decide if it is time for you to make the jump from faculty to administration. Do the qualities that make an excellent faculty member necessarily translate to the dean's office? How do you redefine work relationships as you are called upon to critique faculty who used to be your colleagues? How do you make new connections, as administrators who used to be your supervisors become your colleagues? What new skills will you need to succeed as a dean? This interactive workshop will use group discussion and role playing to help participants navigate these and similar questions.

Session Leaders:
  • Patricia Seabrooks, Ph.D., Associate Dean of Nursing, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Margo Martin, Ed.D., Dean of Instruction and Student Services, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • John Wall, Ph.D., Dean of Liberal Arts, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Monday, March 24, 2014
Morning Sessions
9 a.m. - 12 noon The New Era of Publishing: How to Make It Work for You This interactive workshop outlines the range of publication options available to authors, including traditional large-house publishing, academic and small press publishing, and self-publishing. The workshop addresses the advantages and disadvantages of traditional versus independent publishing and helps authors devise strategies for their own work, often combining traditional and indie publishing approaches.

Session Leader:
  • April Eberhardt, Literary Change Agent, Sonoma, California
Monday, March 24, 2014
Afternoon Sessions
1 p.m. - 4 p.m. ePublishing: Who, What, Where, When, How—and Why There is much discussion in the press about electronic publishing, or ePublishing. What does this form of publishing encompass? Is it right for you? How do you go about ePublishing? Can you publish your work both electronically and conventionally? What do you need to do to be successful? This interactive workshop will help you determine the best path for you and your work.

Session Leader:
  • April Eberhardt, Literary Change Agent, Sonoma, California
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Morning Sessions
9 a.m. - 12 noon Recruitment and Retention of Women and Minorities to STEM Programs, Session 1 (2 half-day sessions in one day) Learn best practices in recruiting and retaining women and minority students to STEM programs through activities, examples and case studies. National Science Foundation supported techniques and research-based methods will be covered. Online and hard copy training materials support the workshop activities. This workshop is designed for college credit faculty and STEM museum educators.

Session Leaders:
  • Ede Slovin, Trainer, National Institute for Women in Trades, Technology and Science (IWITTS)
  • Angel Rodriguez, Ph.D., R. Irene Craney Fischley Endowed Teaching Chair Professor of Biology, Upward Bound STEM and Service Learning programs, Broward College and National Hispanic Community College Council Fellow
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Afternoon Sessions
1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Recruitment and Retention of Women and Minorities to STEM Programs, Session 2 (2 half-day sessions in one day) Review research and learn best practices in recruiting and retaining women and minority students to STEM programs through activities, examples and case studies. (Session 1 meets at 9 a.m. on Tuesday.)

Session Leaders:
  • Ede Slovin, Trainer, National Institute for Women in Trades, Technology and Science (IWITTS)
  • Angel Rodriguez, Ph.D., R. Irene Craney Fischley Endowed Teaching Chair Professor of Biology, Upward Bound STEM and Service Learning programs, Broward College and National Hispanic Community College Council Fellow.
Wednesday, March 26, 2014
3 p.m. - 6 p.m. MOOCs: Education´s Holy Grail or the Great Illusion?-A Seminar MOOCS (Massive Open Online Courses) are described by some as the future of higher education learning because they provide higher education for large numbers of people at very low cost. Others see them as institutional marketing schemes with little foundation in reality. Join your colleagues in an interactive discussion of major ongoing MOOC experiments and the research results to date. Help decide: Where do we go from here?

Session Leaders:
  • Laura W. Perna, Ph.D., Director of the Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy (AHEAD), Professor, Graduate School of Education, Faculty Fellow in the Institute for Urban Research, and Penn Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. She has served as the Vice President of the Postsecondary Education Division (Division J) of the American Education Research Association (AERA) and is currently the President-elect of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE).
  • Linda Harasim, Ph.D., Professor at Simon Fraser University's School of Communication, is a pioneer and one of the inventors of online education. She invented the pedagogy of online collaborative learning at the University of Toronto and taught the first online university course in the world there in 1985. She later moved to Simon Fraser University, Vancouver Canada, where she teaches in the areas of "Social Media and the Knowledge Society." In 1995 she founded and served as CEO of the TeleLearning Network of Centre of Excellence (TL*NCE) in Canada, receiving $25 million from the Canadian government and another $25 million from the public and private sector for an eight-year project to study and design new online collaborative knowledge-building tools, environments and pedagogies for education and training worldwide. Dr. Harasim has written 5 books on the field and is currently at work on a new book.
  • Linda D. Collins, Ed.D., Lead E-Learning Mentor, Northcentral University, and Residential Faculty and Coordinator Open Entry Programs, Mesa Community College


Moderator:
  • Jana Kooi, President, Open Campus, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Thursday, March 27, 2014
3 p.m. - 6 p.m. The Changing Academy: Is It Really Changing? Should It? In What Ways? All around us, college and university administrators, state legislators and governors, and the federal government are suggesting that the traditional academy no longer works in the modern world. They are asking if the current curriculum and modes of operations are relevant or outdated. Does a humanities or history class help someone to get a job? And are lectures to small classes really the most effective learning practices? And yet this is not the first time in history that the academy's relevance has been challenged. This seminar will explore these issues and more as participants debate the future of the traditional academy in a modern world.

Session Leaders:
  • Stephen C. Ehrmann, Ph.D., Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning and Assoc. Professor, Ed. Tech. Leadership, Graduate School of Education and Human Development, George Washington University. Perhaps most well-known for his work with the Teaching, Learning and Technology Group (TLT), Steve Ehrmann has also served as a program officer with The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) as well as the Annenberg/ CPB Projects at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
  • Alan Ruby, Senior Fellow, Higher Education Division, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania. Ruby has a 40-year career in government, business, philanthropy, and education ranging from classroom teacher to Australian deputy secretary of education to chair of the OECD education committee. He currently serves as a consultant to the World Bank, an adviser to the Nazarbayev Intellectual Schools and the Nazarbayev University in Kazakhstan, and as a senior fellow for Internationalization at NAFSA.
  • J. Noah Brown, M.P.P., President and CEO, Association of Community College Trustees (ACCT). Brown provides national leadership on behalf of more than 6,000 elected and appointed officials governing 1,200 community colleges throughout the United States, and his experience spans more than 30 years in the nation's capital. He recently served as a member of the 21st-Century Commission on the Future of Community Colleges.
  • Chris Birch, Professor and Director of Enterprise and Innovation, University of Greenwich Business School, London. Birch served at executive level in two large UK universities with strategic responsibility for research, enterprise, and knowledge transfer. He is an experienced classroom practitioner and was an Internet pedagogic pioneer. His phrase "powered by technology, driven by learning" has been widely used. He is committed to the principle of creating innovative mutually value-adding delivery partnerships.
  • Wyne Karnath, M.A., Adjunct Instructor of English, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Moderator: Cynthia Bioteau, Ph.D., President, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Thursday, March 27, 2014
6 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. (Restricted to FSCJ faculty) Developing the Total Student: An Adjunct and Full-Time Faculty Collaboration This special evening has been developed in response to adjunct faculty feedback. Building on FSCJ's fall semester Adjunct Palooza, this collaborative session will include social/networking time for full-time and adjunct faculty, a plenary session, and a Q&A panel focused on issues of importance to our entire faculty.

Session Leaders:
  • Steve V. Piscitelli, M.A., Professor of History, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • John J. Wall, Ph.D., Dean of Liberal Arts, Florida State College at Jacksonville
  • Jerry E. Fliger, Ph.D., Associate Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Florida State College at Jacksonville
Friday, March 28, 2014
12:30 p.m.- 3:30 p.m. Cultivating Innovators and Big Thinkers: A Lesson Model for Developing Interactive STEM Curriculum The high demand for skilled labor in Nebraska compelled Central Community College leaders and their business partners to respond with the creation of a professional development program to engage secondary and college faculty with business and industry mentors for a full year experience. Project SHINE dramatically increased student participation and interest for high demand technical careers and program completions. Attendees will participate in a series of thought-provoking activities used to examine and conceptualize interactive lessons for secondary and post-secondary students following a format of Asking questions, Exploring concepts, Instructing, Organizing learning, and Understanding (AEIOU).

This session is designed for Workforce Education instructors and administrators.

Session Leaders:
  • Doug Pauley, Director of Training and Development, Central Community College, Columbus, NE
  • Neal Grandgenett, Ph.D., George and Sally Haddix Community Chair of STEM, Education Professor of Mathematics Education, College of Education
  • Dan Davidchik, Project Director/NSF Project Manager
  • Merlin Lahm, Mathematics Teacher, Scotus Central Catholic School, Project SHINE Participant Educator/Facilitator

 

   

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